Past Seminars and Workshops

Spring 2019

Jim Grossman
Executive Director, American Historical Association

Preparing Humanities PhD's for the Future Instead of the Past 

Friday, February 15, 2019, at 12:30pm (Lunch will be provided)
Learning Commons Flexible Program Space,First Floor, Richter Library
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

Slightly less than half of all history Ph.D's end up in tenured or tenure-track positions in colleges and universities. Approximately one-third of those are in research universities. In language and literature, the other discipline for which there are good data, the landscape looks about the same, perhaps even a bit thinner. Are our Ph.D programs preparing students for the careers they are likely to have, whether as faculty in the broad context of higher education or beyond the professoriate? Jim Grossman, executive director of the American Historical Association will discuss the AHA's inquiries into whether and how graduate preparation in history and other humanities disciplines might adapt to this changing landscape. The conversation will consider how our programs can help our Ph.D students broaden their career horizons and better prepare them for that wider terrain. The workshop is directed both towards faculty and graduate students.

Jim Grossman is Executive Director of the American Historical Association. Formerly Vice President for Research and Education at the Newberry Library, he has taught at the University of Chicago and the University of California, San Diego. He is the author of Land of Hope: Chicago, Black Southerners, and the Great Migration and A Chance to Make Good: African-Americans, 1900-1929, and project director and coeditor of The Encyclopedia of Chicago (2005; online edition, 2006).

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Jerry Singerman

Senior Humanities Editor at the University of Pennsylvania Press

Proposal to Book: The Nuts-and-Bolts of Scholarly Publishing 

Friday, March 22nd 2019, at 12:30pm
Executive Board Room, Nursing School

Jerry Singerman

 

The forms and protocols of scholarly publishing may be undergoing rapid transformation, but the peer-reviewed monograph with a print option, published by a university press, remains a currency of choice in the humanities. In this workshop we will look at the current state of academic publishing and will seek to demystify the process of choosing a press, approaching an editor, submitting your manuscript, and moving successfully to publication.
Jerry Singerman is Senior Humanities Editor at the University of Pennsylvania Press, where he acquires books in a broad range of Humanities-based fields, including late ancient, medieval, Renaissance, and Jewish studies, European and American literature, history and theory of landscape architecture, and history of the book.

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Fall 2018

Grant-Writing Workshop for Graduate Students and Early Career Scholars‌‌
Friday, September 14th 2018 at 12:30pm (Lunch will be provided)
Executive Conference Room, Suite 102, School of Nursing
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students


Hugh Thomas, Professor of History and Director of the Center for the Humanities

Heather Diack, Assistant Professor, Art and Art History

Grant writing is one of the most arcane, frustrating, and potentially rewarding tasks scholars face in the current academic environment. Though the workshop is aimed at graduate students and early career scholars, we welcome more senior scholars who wish to gain new insights and ideas or who are willing to share their own experiences. The discussion will be led by two faculty members who have had success in winning grants and fellowships. We will discuss how to look for appropriate grants and how to frame and write a successful proposal.

 


Stacy Hartman
Project Manager, Connected Academics, Modern Language Association
Articulating Humanities Expertise to Broad Audiences
Tuesday, October 30th 2018, at 3:30pm - 5:30pm
Executive Board Room, School of Nursing
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students
 
How do we as humanists talk about our own forms of expertise? Indeed, how do we ourselves perceive those forms of expertise from the inside? How might we better articulate them to a broad public that includes prospective employers from outside the academic humanities? This workshop is designed to underscore the value of advanced study in the humanities to the wider world of work and the interested public. It will begin with an exercise to prompt participants to think capaciously about the forms of expertise they are developing as graduate students in the humanities. Based on this work, participants will then consider ways to describe these forms of expertise in a number of professional genres, including: "elevator pitches," LinkedIn, cover letters, résumés, and job interviews.
Stacy Hartman is a project manager at the Modern Language Association, where she runs Connected Academics, a Mellon Foundation-funded initiative to broaden career horizons for language and literature PhDs. Prior to coming to the MLA, Stacy earned her PhD in German Studies from Stanford University, where she loudly declared in her third year her intention to not pursue a career on the tenure track. At the MLA, she has designed and taught a number of career exploration courses for PhDs, and she is also one of the institutional co-authors of the Doctoral Student Career Planning Guide, intended for faculty members and department administrators. She considers PhD career diversity to be not only a matter of concern for individuals, but also central to making humanities graduate education more student-centered, more sustainable, and, indeed, more joyful.

Spring 2018

Amyrose McCue Gill
Founder, TextFormations

Lunch Seminar on Expanding Career Opportunities for PhDs:
"The Humanist Entrepreneur: Deploying Your Graduate Training Beyond the Academy"

Monday, March 26th 2018, 12:30pm

Executive Board Room, School of Nursing

 

This event is aimed at graduate students thinking about more and less outside-the-box answers to the question "Why am I doing a PhD?". Amyrose McCue Gill (PhD Berkeley, Italian Studies) is the co-founder and an editor and translator with TextFormations, a manuscript preparation services partnership launched in 2015. She will share her postdoctoral experiences and describe how her doctoral work in the humanities came to inform her current career path in unexpected ways. Amyrose is happy to answer questions from questing graduate students and postdocs about everything from the academic job market to balancing family and career; from business concerns (like finances and marketing) to publishing processes (like editing and translation).

Amyrose McCue Gill holds a PhD in Italian Studies from the University of California at Berkeley with specializations in Renaissance literature, early modern history, and women and gender studies. She has been a translator, editor, and project manager for over a decade, and handle projects in English, Italian, French, and Spanish. Her work in North America and Europe. With her colleague Lisa Regan, who earned her PhD in the History of Art, also from Berkeley, she established TextFormations, which provides customized support for writers and researchers in higher education, who are undertaking translation, writing, research, and publishing projects in North America, Europe, Asia, the UK, and the Commonwealth. They have assisted in bringing books to publication from university presses such as Cambridge, Yale, Oxford, Stanford, Toronto, as well as Palgrave, Brepols, Brill, Routledge, and many others; as well as articles published in peer-reviewed journals such as Representations, The Art Bulletin, and Renaissance Quarterly.


Amyrose McCue Gill
Founder, TextFormations‌

Mihoko Suzuki
Professor of English, and Director, Center for the Humanities

 

"Writing and Revising Articles, and Getting Them Published"

Monday, March 26th 2018, 3:30pm

Third Floor Conference Room, Richter Library

 

Mihoko Suzuki (journal editor) and Amyrose McCue Gill (article editor) are available to answer all of your questions about publishing articles in academic journals. What makes for a successful article? How do you choose an appropriate journal? What is the submission and peer review process like? When should I publish an article and how many should I publish? How long does it all take? This event will have a seminar format and will be driven by participant questions; come with all your worries and excitement about article publishing!


‌‌‌

Amyrose McCue Gill
Founder, TextFormations‌

Ben Doyle
Publisher and Head of Literary Studies for the Scholarly Division, Palgrave Macmillan

 

Book Development Workshop:

"From Pitching Proposals to Peer Review and Production"

Tuesday, March 27th 2018, 3:30pm

Third Floor Conference Room, Richter Library

 

 

 This workshop, led by Ben Doyle (publisher for literature with Palgrave) and Amyrose McCue Gill (editor and translator with TextFormations), is aimed at scholars with monograph projects (in mind or in hand) who want to know more about 1. How to pitch a book to a publisher; 2. How to revise a dissertation or manuscript for publication; 3. How to handle the peer review process; and 4. How to prepare for production and publication. We will also touch on edited volumes and on developmental editing but there will be time for lots of Q & A. Come with questions about any and all aspects of publishing books.

Amyrose McCue Gill holds a PhD in Italian Studies from the University of California at Berkeley with specializations in Renaissance literature, early modern history, and women and gender studies. She has been a translator, editor, and project manager for over a decade, and handle projects in English, Italian, French, and Spanish. Her work in North America and Europe. With her colleague Lisa Regan, who earned her PhD in the History of Art, also from Berkeley, she established TextFormations, which provides customized support for writers and researchers in higher education, who are undertaking translation, writing, research, and publishing projects in North America, Europe, Asia, the UK, and the Commonwealth. They have assisted in bringing books to publication from university presses such as Cambridge, Yale, Oxford, Stanford, Toronto, as well as Palgrave, Brepols, Brill, Routledge, and many others; as well as articles published in peer-reviewed journals such as Representations, The Art Bulletin, and Renaissance Quarterly.

Ben Doyle is Publisher and Head of Literary Studies for the Scholarly Division at Palgrave Macmillan. He has worked on the list for nine years, originally starting in 2009 as an Editorial Assistant. Ben oversees an editorial team of five people, based in London and New York


William Germano


Professor of English, The Cooper Union

The Professional Scholarly Writer:
A writing and publishing seminar for academic authors
 

Tuesday, May 1st 2018, 10:00am - 12:00pm in Ashe 427

 

This seminar focuses on the academic as publishing scholar: stressing an identity founded on three components – professional scholarly writer – this seminar is a faculty development initiative designed to increase the young scholar’s critical knowledge of academic publishing in relation to her or his own specific writing project.

The seminar explores strategies for strengthening skills in professional writing and project design as well as scholarly publishing best practice in the print + digital environment. While one focus of the session is the recent Ph.D. and his or her dissertation manuscript, the issues explored extend beyond that horizon: many of the skills required for revising a dissertation are, in fact, the same skills necessary for a productive scholarly writing life. 

The session will cover such topics as the dissertation/book problem, the range of options facing the author, the role of self-presentation, the writing trajectory of the academic career, current practice in submission, print and non-print publication options, and the  role of new media in the individual scholar’s writing and research program. 

Who it’s for 

The session is conceived to be of interest to any faculty member working in a discipline where “the book” – and its commitment to the narratability of scholarly research -- remains the primary unit of scholarly dissemination.

The ideal seminar will include scholars from a range of disciplines, both those in the humanities and those in the social sciences (and occasionally further afield). The crucial common bond is a dependence on narrative – and book publication – as the means by which research given usable shape and disseminated to its audience. A mix of disciplines around the table increases an awareness of disciplinary idiolects and of the writer’s obligation to an audience wide enough to sustain a publisher’s investment. 

What we’ll do  

Each participant is expected to submit a book proposal  (no more than 10 pages) and  a current c.v.  The proposal should include:

  • ·       a narrative description of the intended project

  • ·       a guide to structure (chapters and some indication of their scope and contents)

  • ·       notes  on readership  (market, competition, comparable titles of interest).

Please send materials by email in Word (not as PDFs) to germano@cooper.edu 

Feedback is an important component of this seminar. Each proposal submitted by that date will receive written comments at the beginning of our session.  Auditors are welcome. Unfortunately, written comments cannot be made available for auditors’ proposals. When we meet we’ll work through the conceptual and mechanical challenges of preparing scholarship usable by other scholars. It’s harder than it looks, but easier than it sounds. Maximum enrollment: twenty participants (plus auditors). 

Workshop leader

Seminar leader:  William Germano  is author of  Getting It Published: a Guide for Scholars and Anyone Else Serious about Serious Books (University of Chicago Press, 3/e 2016) and From Dissertation to Book (University of Chicago Press, 2/e 2013). He writes a biweekly blog for the Chronicle of Higher Education’s Lingua Franca blog; he has also published essays on writing and publishing in the Chronicle and elsewhere.  Other books: The Tales of Hoffmann (BFI Film Classics, 2013), on Powell and Pressburger’s 1951 opera-film, and  Eye Chart (Bloomsbury, 2017), a short cultural history of visual measurement. 

During a first career as a scholarly publisher, he worked as editor-in-chief of Columbia University Press and as vice-president and publishing director at Routledge, a position he held for nineteen years.  

Among the authors he has published: Theodor Adorno, Gloria Anzaldúa, Sacvan Bercovitch, Kate Bornstein, Edward Branigan, Judith Butler, Terry Castle, Michel de Certeau, Jonathan Culler, Arthur Danto, Paul de Man, Gilles Deleuze, Vine Deloria, Jr., Jacques Derrida, Denis Donoghue, Rachel Blau DuPlessis, James Elkins, Emory Elliott, Dario Fo, Diana Fuss, Peter Galison, Marjorie Garber, Sander Gilman, Stephen Greenblatt, Antonio Gramsci, Jerzy Grotowski, David Halperin, Donna Haraway, bell hooks, Linda Hutcheon, Fredric Jameson, Martin Jay, E. Ann Kaplan, David Kastan, Evelyn Fox Keller, Julia Kristeva, Amitava Kumar, Biddy Martin, Tania Modleski, Antonio Negri, Stephen Orgel, Andrew Parker, Constance Penley, Edward Said, Mark Seltzer, Kaja Silverman, Kenneth Silverman, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Peter Stallybrass, Konstantin  Stanislavski, Michael Taussig, Gary Taylor, Cornel West, Raymond Williams, Paul Willis, John Winkler, Jack Zipes, and Slavoj Žižek.

Fall 2017

Expanding Career Opportunities for PhDs in the Humanities:
Teaching at Community Colleges

Friday, September 29, 2017 at 12:30pm

Shalala Student Activities Center, Third Floor, Iron Arrow Room
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

  Listen to the Podcast

Kristin Borgwald, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Miami Dade College, Wolfson Campus

Lara Cahill-Booth, Assistant Professor of English, Miami Dade College, Kendall Campus

Stephanie Skenyon, PhD candidate in History and Dissertation Fellow at the Center for the Humanities, UM


This workshop, led by two UM PhDs in Philosophy and English and a PhD candidate in History, explores teaching careers at community colleges. The panelists will discuss the application process as well as share their expectations and experiences teaching at community colleges. Following brief presentations by the panelists, the workshop will shift to Q&A and group discussion.


Kristin Borgwald
is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Miami Dade College, Wolfson Campus where she has taught since 2010. Passionate about civic engagement, she has served on MDC grant teams for the AAC&U/NEH initiatives: Bridging Cultures to Form a Nation (2012-2014) and Citizenship Under Siege (2015-2016). She is also part of the Global Sustainability and Earth Literacy Learning Community at MDC and all of her courses are designated as such. She earned her PhD in Philosophy from the University of Miami in 2011.

 


Lara Cahill-Booth is Assistant Professor of English at Miami Dade College, Kendall Campus where she teaches courses in World Literature, Creative Writing, and Composition. She earned her PhD in English, with a specialization in Hemispheric Caribbean Cultural Studies, from the University of Miami in 2010. Her scholarship on cultural geography and Caribbean literature and performing arts has been published in TDR: The Drama Review, e-misférica, and Journal of Postcolonial Literature.

 

Stephanie Skenyon, Center for the Humanities Dissertation Fellow 2017-2018
Stephanie Skenyon
is a PhD candidate in History and a Dissertation Fellow at the Center for the Humanities, writing on the topic, “Local Boundaries, Cloistered Communities, and Inner Selves: Monastic Identities in Twelfth-Century England.” For six years she was an adjunct professor in the Community College System of New Hampshire, teaching in-class history survey courses and offering online courses through Manchester Community College to students across the United States.




Spring 2016

William Walker‌

Professor, Otto G. Richter Library
Former Dean and University Librarian

National Archives

Tuesday, February 9, 2016 at 12:30pm

M. Christine Schwartz Center for Nursing Education
Executive Board Room
5030 Brunson Drive, Coral Gables 33146
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

Located in Washington, DC and in major cities across the United States, the National Archives is a rich resource for humanities scholars and historians. This seminar session provides an overview of the holdings of the National Archives, their access policies, and recommended strategies for research.  This session also looks at the roles of national archives vs. national libraries. Important overseas archival programs also will be discussed.

Humanities Resources in South Florida Collections

Jeffrey J. Williams

Professor of English
Carnegie Mellon University

Shaping a Scholarly Career: Alternatives to Monographs and Articles

(Lunch Seminar)

Friday, February 26, 2016 at 12:30pm

M. Christine Schwartz Center for Nursing Education, Executive Board Room
5030 Brunson Drive, Coral Gables 33146
For UM Faculty & Grad Students

Theory and Criticism
Reading for Seminar:
PDF is password protected. Password is provided after registering for the event.
Editing and publishing sometimes seem mysterious, like the genie in the machine. Drawing on his experience as a long-time journal editor, working on a Norton anthology, and editing several book collections, such as The Critical Pulse: Thirty-Six Credos by Contemporary Critics (Columbia UP, 2012), Jeffrey Williams will discuss the ins and outs of this other side of scholarship. He will also talk about writing for public rather than academic venues, and the critical interview, which has become a much more common mode.

Jeffrey WilliamsJeffrey Williams is Professor of English and Literary and Cultural Studies at Carnegie Mellon University. He has published widely on the history of the novel, contemporary American fiction, the history of criticism, and the American university. He regularly publishes in magazines such as Dissent and The Chronicle of Higher Education, as well as academic journals. His books include PC Wars: Politics and Theory in the Academy (1994); The Institution of Literature (2001); Critics at Work: Interviews (2004); Theory and the Novel: Narrative Reflexivity in the English Tradition (2009); and How to Be an Intellectual: Essays on Criticism, Culture, and Politics (2014). He is one of the editors of The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism (2001; 2nd ed. 2010), and also served as editor of the Minnesota Reviewfrom 1992 to 2010.


Mark Salber Phillips

Professor of History
Carleton University

On Historical Distance

(Lunch Seminar)

Friday, March 25, 2016 at 12:30pm

M. Christine Schwartz Center for Nursing Education
Executive Board Room,

5030 Brunson Drive, Coral Gables 33146
For Faculty & Grad Students

 Cosponsored by the Departments of History and English

On Historical Distance

Readings for Lunch Seminar:
 On Historical Distance, Preface and Intro Pages 1-13

 On Historical Distance, Chapter 9 Sentimental Histories

PDF is password protected. Password will be provided after registering for the event.


Mark Salber PhillipsMark Salber Phillips is Professor of History with a cross appointment in the Institute for Comparative Studies in Literature, Art, and Culture at Carleton University. He is the author of many books, including Society and Sentiment: Genres of Historical Writing in Britain, 1740-1820 (2000) and On Historical Distance (2013), awarded the 2014 Wallace K Ferguson Prize given by the Canadian Historical Association. His current research includes philosophy of history and historiography, intellectual history, and European historical thought in the Renaissance, Enlightenment, and the late twentieth century.


Expanding Career Opportunities for Humanities PhDs‌

Thursday, April 14, 2016 at 3:30pm

M. Christine Schwartz Center for Nursing Education, Executive Board Room
5030 Brunson Drive, Coral Gables 33146
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

Expanding Career Opportunities for Humanities PhDs‌

Have you ever considered transitioning from the academy to a career in scholarly publishing? This overview of publishing outlets for scholarly work in the humanities will address topics such as: today’s scholarly publishing landscape, and possible career pathways from academia to publishing.

Adina Popescu Berk

Adina Popescu Berk is Senior Editor and Group Lead in Humanities and History in the Reference group at Oxford University Press. She has been an editor at Cambridge University Press, Basic Books, Westview Press, and HarperCollins, and her editorial career has spanned the breadth of scholarly publishing, including reference, monographs, textbooks, trade books, and journals. She holds a doctorate in history from Columbia University.

Matthew McAdam

Matthew McAdam is a Senior Acquisitions Editor at Johns Hopkins University Press. He acquires and commissions academic monographs, course books, and trade titles throughout the humanities focusing in particular on literary studies, classics and ancient history, intellectual history, and the history of science. Prior to joining Hopkins in 2009, he was the philosophy editor at Lexington Books, an imprint of Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. He has a doctorate in philosophy from Georgetown University.


Scholarlly Publishing Seminar

Friday, April 15, 2016 at 12:00pm

M. Christine Schwartz Center for Nursing Education, Executive Board Room
5030 Brunson Drive, Coral Gables 33146
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

Expanding Career Opportunities for Humanities PhDs‌

An overview of publishing outlets for scholarly work in the humanities. What do editors look for? How should I decide where to publish my work? How to approach editors? How do I write a book proposal? These and any questions you bring will be the subject of this seminar.

Adina Popescu Berk

Adina Popescu Berk is Senior Editor and Group Lead in Humanities and History in the Reference group at Oxford University Press. She has been an editor at Cambridge University Press, Basic Books, Westview Press, and HarperCollins, and her editorial career has spanned the breadth of scholarly publishing, including reference, monographs, textbooks, trade books, and journals. She holds a doctorate in history from Columbia University.

Matthew McAdam

Matthew McAdam is a Senior Acquisitions Editor at Johns Hopkins University Press. He acquires and commissions academic monographs, course books, and trade titles throughout the humanities focusing in particular on literary studies, classics and ancient history, intellectual history, and the history of science. Prior to joining Hopkins in 2009, he was the philosophy editor at Lexington Books, an imprint of Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. He has a doctorate in philosophy from Georgetown University.


The Future of Academic Publishing

Wednesday, April 20, 2016 at 4:00pm
Otto G. Richter Library, Third Floor Conference Room
Registration Required  |  Open to the Public
Cosponsored by University of Miami Libraries
Expanding Career Opportunities for Humanities PhDs‌

What will the university press of the future look like? This panel will begin by laying out the current status of academic publishing (e.g., impact of the e-book; declining library sales; consequence of the acquisition of presses by conglomerates); it will then turn to discuss prospects for the future (e.g., publishing on digital platforms that enable interactive features; open access). Topics to be addressed include coming changes in the nature of publishing operations, business models, and organizational contexts.

Peter BerkeryPeter Berkery has been Executive Director of AAUP since early 2013. He was previously Vice President and Publisher for the US Law Division at Oxford University Press. Berkery has a BA in Classical Studies from Boston College, and an MA and a JD from The American University, as well as a Master of Laws in Taxation from George Washington University.

Peter PotterPeter Potter, who was editor-in-chief at Cornell University Press since 2006, became Director of Publishing Strategy for University Libraries at Virginia Tech in January 2016. Before Cornell, he worked at The Pennsylvania State University Press as editor-in-chief and associate director, and held editor and acting director positions at the Wesleyan University Press. Throughout his nearly 30 years in university press publishing, Potter has been a leader in efforts to integrate new technologies into scholarly publishing practices, specifically working to leverage the complementary strengths of a university press and a university library to elevate faculty research, for example by helping to launch the Office of Digital Scholarly Publishing at Penn State--one of the first centers to be jointly sponsored by a university library and a university press. He received his bachelor's degree in history from Virginia Tech and his master's degree in history from the University of Virginia. 

Fall 2015

Expanding Career Opportunities for PhDs in the Libraries‌

Friday, September 25, 2015 at 12:30pm

M. Christine Schwartz Center for Nursing Education
Executive Board Room
5030 Brunson Drive, Coral Gables 33146
For UM Faculty & Grad Students

Engage in conversation about career opportunities in 21st-century libraries and cultural institutions with a distinguished panel of University of Miami Library administrators and postdoctoral fellows, whose research interests include the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. Listen to their stories, learn about strategies to explore careers in libraries and archives as well as fellowship opportunities, and ask them your questions at this interactive session.

Expanding Career Opportunities for PhDs in the Libraries‌

Charles Eckman

Charles Eckman, Dean of Libraries, Otto G. Richter Library, University of Miami
Dr. Eckman previously served as university librarian and dean of library services at Simon Fraser University (2010-13), director of collections at the University of California, Berkeley (2006-10), and principal government documents librarian and head of the social sciences resource group at Stanford University (1997-2006). 

Dr. Eckman has managed and consulted for several digital library initiatives.  He has served on the board of directors for the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries, Canadian Association of Research Libraries, and Canadian Research Knowledge Network; he also served on the Depository Library Council to the Public Printer. Dr. Eckman’s research interests include information policy, open access initiatives, digital scholarship, and the evolution of scholarly communication. He holds an MLIS from UC Berkeley, a PhD and MA in Politics from Princeton University, and a BA in Political Science from Indiana University.

Kelly MillerKelly Miller, Associate Dean, Learning & Research Services, University of Miami
Dr. Miller earned a PhD in Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Michigan and held a Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Virginia. Prior to joining the UML, she worked at UCLA Library.

Timothy NorrisTimothy Norris, CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Miami
Tim Norris is a second-year Council of Library and Information Resources (CLIR) Postdoctoral Fellow in Data Curation at the University of Miami Libraries. He earned a PhD in Environmental Studies (a.k.a. Geography) at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC). Prior to his doctoral work at UCSC he started and maintained a small development NGO in Peru.

Martin TsangMartin Tsang, CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Miami
Martin Tsang serves as a liaison librarian for faculty and students in History and Area Studies. Martin is working to develop print and digital collections, provide consultative and instructional research support services, and assist the Libraries in designing a new model for transformative library engagement with our research and teaching communities. Martin is an anthropologist and received his PhD at Florida International University. He was awarded fellowships at the Cuban Heritage Collection for his doctoral dissertation that focuses on the Chinese Cubans. Prior to his position at UML, Martin was a postdoctoral research fellow on a National Institutes of Health-funded project investigating HIV, drug use, and the tourist industry in the Dominican Republic using a "syndemics" framework. 


William Walker‌

Professor, Otto G. Richter Library
Former Dean and University Librarian

Art Libraries and Visual Resources

Tuesday, October 27, 2015 at 12:30pm

M. Christine Schwartz Center for Nursing Education
Executive Board Room
5030 Brunson Drive, Coral Gables 33146
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

Professors William Walker, Perri Lee Roberts, and Nathan Timpano will discuss major art information resources and libraries, their unique and important collections as well as their fellowship programs.

Special focus will be given to resources at the Getty Research Institute, the Frick Collection's Art Reference Library, and the Metropolitan Museum's Watson Library.  The session will also include recommendations for finding images for research and publication, processes for obtaining rights and permissions, and hints on the most cost effective resources to consult.

Humanities Resources in South Florida Collections

William Walker‌

Professor, Otto G. Richter Library
Former Dean and University Librarian

Humanities Resources in South Florida Collections

Friday, November 13, 2015 at 12:30pm

M. Christine Schwartz Center for Nursing Education
Executive Board Room
5030 Brunson Drive, Coral Gables 33146
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

Humanities resources in our own backyard are frequently overlooked.  Join Professors William Walker and Robin Bachin to explore resources which complement UM collections. Discussion will include collections at HistoryMiami, Vizcaya, the Black Archive, the Stonewall Archive, and the Miami Dade Public Library.

Humanities Resources in South Florida Collections