Seminars & Workshops

FALL 2019

Maren Wood:

"How to Launch Your Career Beyond the Professoriate and Success Stories from PhDs Who Have"

Monday, September 16

4:00-5:30pm

Richter Library 3rd Floor Conference Room

PhDs define career success as doing work that has a positive impact on society, keeps them intellectually engaged and inspired, and connects them to people and projects that matter to them. This kind of career and life can be found within academia, and far beyond it. And that’s why PhDs work everywhere, across all industries and sectors, contributing their talents and skills to benefit society. This keynote presentation will combining data on the history of the job market crisis, stories of successful career transitions, and strategies humanities PhDs have used to successfully launch meaningful post-academic careers, to help students develop their own strategy for career success. 

This keynote address is offered by Dr. Maren Wood as a precursor to her workshop scheduled for Tuesday, September 17.  PhD candidates from all disciplines are welcome to attend this keynote, although it may be especially useful for humanities students planning to attend the workshop on September 17th, which will be more specifically focused on the humanities. Register for the keynote here by Thursday, September 12th.

L. Maren Wood, PhD, is the founder and CEO of Beyond the Professoriate, a mission-driven organization that provides career education and professional development for graduate students and PhDs. Beyond Prof provides services to individuals, and partner with institutions to support their efforts in empowering students and postdocs to leverage their education wherever smart people are needed. Dr. Wood has been a lead researcher on several important studies on the academic and non-academic job market for humanities and social science PhDs, working for the American Historical Association and the Chronicle of Higher Education. Her writing has appeared in the Chronicle of Higher Education, Inside Higher Ed, and University Affairs. Her essay, “How to Move Beyond the Professoriate” is part of the edited collection, Succeeding Outside the Academy, published this fall by the University of Kansas Press. Dr. Wood grew up in Alberta, Canada. She earned her PhD in history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Today, she lives in Denver. 


Maren Wood:

"How to Make Good Career Decisions During Your PhD or Postdoc"

Tuesday, September 17

12:30-2pm

Richter Library: Cuban Heritage Collection Conference Room

Making good career decisions depends on understanding our own values, priorities, and strengths. Knowing what we each find fun, engaging, meaningful, and rewarding is crucial to identifying jobs that work for us. Yet when it comes to thinking about next career steps, we tend to jump past this step. We jump into skill assessments, industry research, and resume writing. This interactive workshop will focus on deeper considerations. Participants will: 

  • Identity what’s important to them in their personal and professional lives;
  • Understand how their personal strengths and values can make them uniquely valuable to potential employers;
  • Be able to better and more confidently make career decisions that make sense for them;

This workshop is offered by Dr. Maren Wood as a follow-up to her September 16th keynote (see above) but attending the keynote is not a prerequisite for the workshop.  This workshop is designed for humaniites PhD students.  Register for this workshop here by Thursday, September 12.  

L. Maren Wood, PhD, is the founder and CEO of Beyond the Professoriate, a mission-driven organization that provides career education and professional development for graduate students and PhDs. Beyond Prof provides services to individuals, and partner with institutions to support their efforts in empowering students and postdocs to leverage their education wherever smart people are needed. Dr. Wood has been a lead researcher on several important studies on the academic and non-academic job market for humanities and social science PhDs, working for the American Historical Association and the Chronicle of Higher Education. Her writing has appeared in the Chronicle of Higher Education, Inside Higher Ed, and University Affairs. Her essay, “How to Move Beyond the Professoriate” is part of the edited collection, Succeeding Outside the Academy, published this fall by the University of Kansas Press. Dr. Wood grew up in Alberta, Canada. She earned her PhD in history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Today, she lives in Denver. 


John Cox:

"NEH Grant-Writing"

Friday, September 27

11:00am-12:30pm

Shalala Center, Room 300

John Cox, Deputy Director of the Division of Education with the National Endowment for the Humanities, will provide an introduction and a general overview of Endowment programs and special initiatives. This session will also address strategies for writing competitive applications and better understanding the review process.  Register by September 23. 

 *Participants may also register for a second session, the NEH Grant Mock Panel, with specific examples of NEH applications, to immediately follow this presentation.  Scroll down for more information.

John Cox is Deputy Director of the Division of Education. He received his PhD in English from the University of Mississippi in 2000. Prior to coming to NEH, he was an associate professor of English and the director of graduate studies at Georgia College & State University. In addition, he has taught secondary school literature and composition in the United States and abroad. His book, Traveling South: Travel Narratives and the Construction of American Identity, was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2005. He has also written and presented on William Bartram, William Faulkner, Flannery O’Connor, and other topics related to American literature.


John Cox:

"NEH Grant Mock Panel"

Friday, September 27

12:45-2:30pm

Shalala Center, Room 300

Following an introductory workshop on the NEH grant application process (see above), Dr. John Cox will host a mock review panel where panelists will share their thoughts on sample proposals and discuss their decision process for the audience.  Attendees are encouraged to read the sample proposals in advance (available below and provided to registrants via email).  Register by September 23.  Lunch will be provided so we encourage you to arrive a few minutes early to serve yourselves. 

*The panel may be especially helpful to those who attend the NEH Grant-Writing Workshop preceding this event, for which guests must register separately.  Scroll up for more details on the workshop.

Mock Panel Samples

John Cox is Deputy Director of the Division of Education. He received his PhD in English from the University of Mississippi in 2000. Prior to coming to NEH, he was an associate professor of English and the director of graduate studies at Georgia College & State University. In addition, he has taught secondary school literature and composition in the United States and abroad. His book, Traveling South: Travel Narratives and the Construction of American Identity, was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2005. He has also written and presented on William Bartram, William Faulkner, Flannery O’Connor, and other topics related to American literature.

 

 


Mimi Sheller:

Stanford Lunch Seminar: "Envisioning Radical Caribbean Reconstruction: A Workshop on Social Change"

Friday, October 4

12:30- 1:45pm

Following her public Stanford Lecture on October 3, Professor Mimi Sheller will offer this workshop, drawing on her forthcoming book, Island Futures: Caribbean Survival in the Anthropocene (Duke UP, 2020). Sheller will consider how decolonial projects in the Caribbean have long offered and continue to offer alternative visions of a future beyond coloniality. Counter-platforms for post-disaster “reconstruction”, from post-earthquake Haiti to recent events in Puerto Rico post-hurricane, suggest radical approaches that surpass climate “adaptation” and “resilience”. Drawing on examples of “insurgent intellectual networks”, transnational feminist and LGBTQ movements, and indigenous and peasant social movements, Sheller will lead participants in analyzing alternative forms of development that are more resistant to climate disruption. 

*This event is intended for graduate students and faculty.  Please monitor your email for an invitation and information on registering.  If you have not received an invitation but would like to attend, please contact Dr. Meg Homer at mkh81@miami.edu to inquire about available space. 


Allan Brandt:

Stanford Lunch Seminar: "How to (De)stigmatize an Epidemic: Lessons from the Public Humanities"

Friday, November 22nd

12:30- 1:45pm

Following his public Stanford Lecture on November 21, Allan Brandt will offer a lunch seminar for faculty and students.  This seminar will provide a brief evaluation of successful and less successful of recent strategies to reduce the stigma of diseases.  It will address the question of how we can use history, language, literature, and cultural analysis to understand how stigma might be more effectively addressed in contemporary medicine, public health, and media.   Examples will be drawn from the history of cancer, HIV, obesity, and disability among others, with the goal of identifying constructive strategies and interventions. . 

*This event is intended for students and faculty.  Please monitor your email for an invitation and information on registering.  If you have not received an invitation but would like to attend, please contact Dr. Meg Homer at mkh81@miami.edu to inquire about available space. 

 

SPRING 2020


Sara Ahmed:

Stanford Lunch Seminar: "TBA

Friday, February 7th

12:30- 1:45pm

Following her public Stanford Lecture on February 6th, Sarah Ahmed will offer a lunch seminar for faculty and students.  Please check back for further details.   

*This event is intended for students and faculty.  Please monitor your email for an invitation and information on registering.  If you have not received an invitation but would like to attend, please contact Dr. Meg Homer at mkh81@miami.edu to inquire about available space. 


Gisela Fosado:

"Publishing Your Book: Advice from an Editor"

Tuesday, March 24 at TBA

Navigating the publishing world can feel daunting, particularly in an environment where presses face an ever-shrinking monograph market and are continually adjusting their publishing programs to stay solvent.  In light of these challenges, Dr. Gisela Fosado’s workshop will cover topics such as how to shape your project to broaden its readership, navigate the world of academic publishing, understand an editor's role, prepare for and get the most out of the peer review process, and help make your book a success once it's published.  Faculty and students planning to publish their research are encouraged to attend!  Please register by March 20.  

 

Gisela Fosado is an Editor at Duke University Press and publishes books in a wide range of areas in the humanities and social sciences, including anthropology, sociology, American and Atlantic World history, gender and sexuality studies, race and ethnicity, African American and Africana studies, environmental studies, and Latin American and Latinx Studies. She works with authors writing scholarly books, as well as those for general readerships, and is particularly interested in books that foreground marginalized perspectives, adopt an intersectional approach, and contribute to our understanding of social movements and inequality.

 

 


Stephanie Burt:

Stanford Lunch Seminar: "Poems, Portraits, Characters"

Friday, April 3rd

12:30- 1:45pm

Following her public Stanford Lecture on April 2nd, Stephanie Burt will offer a lunch seminar for faculty and students: What choices do poets make when depicting historical or imaginary characters, or when giving a life and a personality to a tree, a coin, an eel, a wrench? How can we, if we write poetry ourselves, learn from poems depicting imagined characters, and what resources can those poems bring to us as we read the rest of the world? We'll ask those questions with examples from Anglo-Saxon and from ancient Greek, from Keats and Emily Dickinson and Terrance Hayes and Louise Gluck and Carter Revard, and from other contemporary examples. We may end up with a poetry-writing exercise of our own.

  

*This event is intended for students and faculty.  Please monitor your email for an invitation and information on registering.  If you have not received an invitation but would like to attend, please contact Dr. Meg Homer at mkh81@miami.edu to inquire about available space.