Past Events

  • SEPTEMBER 2018

     Cosponsored by the UM Graduate School

    Expanding Career Opportunities for PhDs in the Humanities: Teaching at Community Colleges

    Kristin Borgwald

    Associate Professor of Philosophy, Miami-Dade College, Wolfson Campus

    Lara Cahill-Booth

    Assistant Professor of English, Miami-Dade College, Kendall Campus

    Stephanie Skenyon

    PhD Candidate in History and Dissertation Fellow at the Center for the Humanities, University of Miami

    Friday
    9-29-17
    12:30 PM

    Seminar:
    Shalala Student Center, Iron Arrow
    For UM Faculty & Grad Students‌‌
      Listen to the Podcast

     

    This workshop, led by two UM PhDs in Philosophy and English and a PhD candidate in History, explores teaching careers at community colleges. The panelists will discuss the application process as well as share their expectations and experiences teaching at community colleges. Following brief presentations by the panelists, the workshop will shift to Q&A and group discussion.

    More Information >>


    Wine Glasses Illustration for the Humanities Fall Reception 2017-2018 (Center for the Humanities)

    RESCHEDULED: Fall Reception for Humanities Faculty & Graduate Students


    Friday
    9-29-17
    3:30 PM

    Shalala Student Center, Third Floor, Iron Arrow Room
    For UM Humanities Faculty, Grad Students, and by Invitation

  • OCTOBER 2018

    "Making Objects & Events" book cover by Simon Evnine (BookTalk @ Books & Books)
    ‌Simon Evnine
    Simon Evnine - photo for BookTalk at Books & Books

    Professor of Philosophy
    University of Miami

    Making Objects and Events:
    A Hylomorphic Theory of Artifacts, Actions, and Organisms

    Wednesday
    10-4-17

    8:00 PM
    Books & Books
    Public Invited
    Directions...


     Listen to the Podcast

    Making Objects and Events: A Hylomorphic Theory of Artifacts, Actions, and Organismsis a study in the metaphysics of the world we make around us, the world of humble artifacts like tables and chairs, as well as sublime artifacts like symphonies, novels, and paintings. Artifacts such as these present a host of philosophical puzzles. How much change can they undergo without ceasing to exist? When they have functions (as chairs have the function of being sat on), how do they come to have these functions, and how are those functions related to the intentions of their makers? In providing answers to these and other questions, the book develops a vision of artifacts as being the impressions of minds on matter; their essences lie in the ways they come to exist, the ways in which makers impose their intentions onto the matter available to them.

    Simon Evnine is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Miami. His areas of research include epistemology, metaphysics, and philosophy of mind. He is the author of Epistemic Dimensions of Personhood (Oxford University Press, 2008), Donald Davidson (Stanford University Press, 1991), and articles in such journals as Mind, Synthese, and Journal of the History of Philosophy on topics in epistemology and the philosophy of mind, Locke, Hume, and Freud.



    2016-2017 Center for the Humanities ‌Fellows Symposium


    Friday
    10-6-17

    REGISTER

    Richter Library, Third Floor Conference Room
    For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

    Session 1 : 9:30am - 11:00am
    • "From National to Transnational: The Creation of a European Supersonic and a European Aircraft Industry," 
    Drewry Wofford (History)
    • "The Indebted Immigrant," Aleksandra Perisic (MLL)
    • "Genre and Legibility in Niger Delta Resource Conflict Novels," Alok Amatya (English)


    Session 2 : 11:15am - 12:15pm
    • "'The new moon with the old moon in her arms': Androgynous Subjectivity and the Re-Creative Poetics of Samuel Taylor Coleridge," Kathryn Freeman (English)
    • "Object Lessons from the Revolutionary Atlantic," Ashli White (History)


    LUNCH : 12:15pm - 1:30pm


    Session 3 : 1:30pm - 3:00pm

    • "Cartographic Visuality in the Italian Maritime Republics, 1100-1400," Karen Mathews (Art & Art History)
    • "A Murderess and Mexico's First Spanish Peyote Eaters," Martin Nesvig (History)
    • "Uprooting Poems in the 1570s," Jessica Rosenberg (English)
    Session 4 : 3:15pm - 4:15pm
    • "Comparative Classics East and West," John Kirby (Classics)
    • "The Beginnings of Christian Literature," Robyn Walsh (Religious Studies)
    Hide Text

     


    Henry King Stanford Distinguished Professor Lecture Series 2017-2018

    graphic for Humanities calendar

    Annette Gordon-Reed

    Charles Warren Professor of American Legal History, Harvard Law School
    Professor of History, Faculty of Arts & Sciences, Harvard University

    Making Black Citizenship: The Importance and Limits of the Law (Public Lecture)


    Thursday
    10-19-17
    7:00 PM

    Public Lecture
    Shalala Student Center, Third Floor, Grand Ballroom West
    Public Invited

      Listen to the Podcast 

    “No historian has done more to recover the stories of enslaved blacks than Annette Gordon-Reed, whose 2008 book The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family won the 2009 Pulitzer Prize in History, as well as wide acclaim, for its subtle portrayal of the relationship between Thomas Jefferson and the remarkable, multigenerational Hemings family.”
    — Fergus M. Bordewich, National Endowment for the Humanities

    More Information >> 


     
    Hemispheric Caribbean Studies: Collaborative Research and Teaching Proposals (cosponsorship)

    Cosponsored by  
    the Joseph Carter Memorial Fund, the Center for the Humanities,
    the Institute for Advanced Study of the Ameicas, Center for Hispanic and Caribbean Legal Studies, Marta S. Weeks Chair in Latin American Studies, American Studies Program, Hemispheric Caribbean Studies, Latin American Studies Program, the Departments of History, Philosophy, and English.

    Hemispheric Caribbean Studies: Collaborative Research and Teaching Proposals


    Friday
    10-20-17
    All Day Otto G. Richter Library
    Third Floor Conference Room
    More Information >>

  • NOVEMBER 2018


    Richard P. Martin

    Antony and Isabelle Raubitschek Professor of Classics
    Stanford University

    Homeric Poetry and Local Religion: Cults of Zeus in the Iliad (Public Lecture)


    Thursday
    11-9-17
    7:00 PM

    Public Lecture
    Newman Alumni Center, Multipurpose Room
    Public Invited

      Listen to the Podcast


     

     

    The Language of Heroes: Speech and Performance in the Iliad] is a major contribution to classics, literary criticism, and oral poetics.” 
    — Michael N. Nagler, The Journal of American Folklore

    More Information >>

     Sponsored by the University of Miami College of Arts & Sciences, the Center for the Humanities, and the Department of Classics

     Symposium
    Homer & His Legacy

    Friday, November 10, 2017
    Shalala Student Center
    Third Floor, Grand Ballroom West


    Click here for more information

      Click here to listen to the podcasts

  • DECEMBER 2018

    "The Afterlife of Al-Andalus: Muslim Iberia in Contemporary Arab and Hispanic Narratives" by Cristina Civantos

    Christina Civantos

    Associate Professor of Spanish and Arabic
    University of Miami

    The Afterlife of Al-Andalus:
    Muslim Iberia in Contemporary Arab and Hispanic Narratives
    Wednesday
    12-6-17

    8:00 PM
    Books & Books
    Public Invited
    Directions...

      Listen to Podcast

    Around the globe, concerns about interfaith relations have led to efforts to find earlier models in Muslim Iberia (al-Andalus). The first study to undertake a wide-ranging comparison of invocations of al-Andalus across the Arab and Hispanic worlds, this book examines how Muslim Iberia operates as an icon or symbol of identity in twentieth and twenty-first century narrative, drama, television, and film from the Arab world, Spain, and Argentina. Christina Civantos demonstrates how cultural agents in the present ascribe importance to the past and how dominant accounts of this importance are contested. Civantos’s analysis reveals that, alongside established narratives that use al-Andalus to create exclusionary, imperial identities, there are alternate discourses about the legacy of al-Andalus that rewrite the traditional narratives. In the process, these discourses critique their imperial and gendered dimensions and pursue intercultural translation.

    Christina E. Civantos is Associate Professor of Spanish and Arabic at the University of Miami.  She researches and teaches modern Hispanic and Arabic literary and cultural studies, with a focus on postcolonial studies, nationalisms, the Arab diaspora in the Americas, and the ethno-racial and gender politics of literacy. Her publications include numerous essays on these topics as well as the book Between Argentines and Arabs: Argentine Orientalism, Arab Immigrants, and the Writing of Identity (SUNY, 2006). She has been the recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowship. 

  • JANUARY 2019

    B. Christine Arce - "México’s Nobodies: The Cultural Legacy of the Soldadera and Afro-Mexican Women"

    Chrissy Arce

    Associate Professor of Spanish
    University of Miami

    México’s Nobodies:
    The Cultural Legacy of the Soldadera and Afro-Mexican Women

    Wednesday
    1-24-18

    8:00 PM
    Books & Books
    Public Invited
    Directions...
     

    México’s Nobodies examines two key figures in Mexican history that have remained anonymous despite their proliferation in the arts: the soldadera and the figure of the mulata. Chrissy Arce unravels the stunning paradox evident in the simultaneous erasure (in official circles) and ongoing fascination (in the popular imagination) with the nameless people who both define and fall outside of traditional norms of national identity. The book traces the legacy of these extraordinary figures in popular histories and legends, the Inquisition, ballads such as “La Adelita” and “La Cucaracha,” iconic performers like Toña la Negra, and musical genres such as the son jarocho and danzón. This study is the first of its kind to draw attention to art’s crucial role in bearing witness to the rich heritage of blacks and women in contemporary México.

    Chrissy Arce is Associate Professor of Spanish at the University of Miami. She works on issues of race and gender in Mexican, Caribbean, and Brazilian cultural production and has a vital interest in immigration and non-Western epistemologies. She has published articles in such journals as Callaloo and Aztlán.

     

    Henry King Stanford Distinguished Professor Lecture Series 2017-2018

    Artifacts GIF for the 2017-2018 Center for the Humanities Calendar in representation of Henry King Stanford Distinguished Professor Elizabeth Hill Boone

    Elizabeth Hill Boone

    Professor of History of Art
    Martha and Donald Robertson Chair in Latin American Art
    Tulane University

    Spatial Grammars: The Union of Art and Writing in the Painted Books of Aztec Mexico (Public Lecture)


    Thursday
    1-25-18
    7:00 PM

    REGISTER

    RESCHEDULED

    Public Lecture
    Newman Alumni Center, Multipurpose Room
    Public Invited

    “Boone offers many new interpretations of interest to the specialist. However, the book [Cycles of Time and Meaning in the Mexican Books of Fate] will be most appreciated for the way in which it makes a complex artistic and intellectual system intelligible to the nonspecialist.”
    — Matthew G. Looper, The Historian

    More Information >>

  • FEBRUARY 2019

    "The Work of the Dead" by Thomas W. Laqueur

    Sponsored by the Department of History's Speakers Series

    Thomas W. Laqueur

    Helen Fawcett Professor of History, University of California, Berkeley
    Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar

    Why Do We Care for the Dead?


    Monday
    2-5-18
    4:30pm

    REGISTER

    Shalala Student Center, Third Floor, Activities Room North
    Public Invited

    Why do the living need the dead? And why do they care for their bodies? This lecture examines the deep historical anthropology of the care for the dead and how it figures in the origin stories of many civilizations; it will explore the question of the discovery of death.

    More Information >>

    Henry King Stanford Distinguished Professor Lecture Series 2017-2018


    Vincent Brown

    Charles Warren Professor of History
    Professor of African and African American Studies
    Harvard University

    The Coromantee War: Charting the Course of an Atlantic Slave Revolt (Public Lecture)


    Thursday
    2-15-18
    7:00 PM

    REGISTER

    Public Lecture
    Location TBA
    Public Invited

    “Vincent Brown makes the dead talk. With his deep learning and powerful historical imagination, he calls upon the departed to explain the living. The Reaper’s Garden stretches the historical canvas and forces readers to think afresh. It is a major contribution to the history of Atlantic slavery.”
    — Ira Berlin, author of Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America

    More Information >>

    "The Bioarchaeology of Socio-Sexual Lives: Queering Common Sense About Sex, Gender, and Sexuality" by Pamela Geller (BookTalk at Books & Books 2018) Web version / thumb version of Pamela Geller for BookTalk @ Books & Books

    Pamela Geller

    Assistant Professor of Anthropology
    University of Miami

    The Bioarchaeology of Socio-Sexual Lives: 
    Queering Common Sense About Sex, Gender, and Sexuality

    Wednesday
    2-21-18

    8:00 PM
    Books & Books
    Public Invited
    Directions...
     

    The Bioarchaeology of Socio-Sexual Lives corrects a major shortcoming in many scholarly and popular presentations of past socio-sexual lives. They reveal little about the ancient or historic group under study and much about Western society’s modern state of heteronormative affairs. To interrogate commonsensical thinking about socio-sexual identities and interactions, this volume draws from critical feminist and queer studies. Reciprocally, bioarchaeological studies extend social theorizing about sex, gender, and sexuality that emphasizes the modern, conceptual, and discursive. Ultimately, The Bioarchaeology of Socio-Sexual Lives invites readers to think more deeply about humanity’s diversity, the naturalization of culture, and the past’s presentation in mass-media communications.

    Pamela Geller is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Miami. She is strongly committed to transdisciplinarity; her research interests include bioarchaeology, feminist and queer studies, materiality of identity, bio-politics and the body, and the socio-politics of the past. She has conducted fieldwork in Israel, Hawai’i, Belize, Honduras, and Perú, and has recently finished a biohistorical study of Samuel G. Morton and his controversial crania collection. Based on this research, Geller is working on a book titled Your Obedient Servant: The Socio-politics of the Samuel G. Morton Crania Collection. In summer 2015, Professor Geller initiated a project in northern Haiti; this work investigates contemporary peoples’ interactions and understanding of patrimony associated with the UNESCO World Heritage Site Parc National Historique (comprised of Sans Souci Palace, Citadelle Laferrière, and Ramiers). She has published widely in such journals as American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Cambridge Archaeological Journal, Ancient Mesoamerica, American Anthropologist, and Annual Review of Anthropology.

    Presented by the Center for the Humanities Animal Studies & Environmental Humanities Interdisciplinary Research Group

    Alan Mikhail

    Professor of History, Yale University

    Live Stocks: Animals and Economic Transformation in Ottoman Egypt


    Thursday
    2-22-18
    4:30 PM

    REGISTER

    Richter Library, Third Floor Conference Room
    Public Invited

    This talk offers a template for understanding how rural economies based both on animal wealth and the shared labor of humans and animals changed at the end of the eighteenth-century to effect the global transition of early modern rural societies from subsistence to commercialized agriculture. Combining the literatures of human-animal relations, early modern agriculture, and Ottoman economic and social history, this talk argues for the importance of nonhuman histories in understanding global economic, energetic, and political transformations.

    More Information >> 

  • MARCH 2019

    Henry King Stanford Distinguished Professor Lecture Series 2017-2018

    Humanities Calendar version of Dylan Penningroth's graphic

    Dylan C. Penningroth

    Professor of History and Law
    University of California, Berkeley

    Law for a Gospel Church: African American Religion and Legal Culture, 1865-1970 (Public Lecture)


    Thursday
    3-1-18
    7:00 PM

    REGISTER

    Public Lecture
    Shalala Student Center, Third Floor, Grand Ballroom East
    Public Invited

    “Penningroth applies an intellectual framework laden with insights gleaned from African Studies and anthropology, making this book [The Claims of Kinfolk] an ambitious exercise in interdisciplinary scholarship and comparative history.”
    American Historical Review

    More Information >>


    Presented by the Center for the Humanities Animal Studies & Environmental Humanities Interdisciplinary Research Group

    Alan Mikhail

    Professor of History, Yale University

    Live Stocks: Animals and Economic Transformation in Ottoman Egypt


    Thursday
    2-22-18
    4:30 PM

    REGISTER

    Richter Library, Third Floor Conference Room
    Public Invited

    This talk offers a template for understanding how rural economies based both on animal wealth and the shared labor of humans and animals changed at the end of the eighteenth-century to effect the global transition of early modern rural societies from subsistence to commercialized agriculture. Combining the literatures of human-animal relations, early modern agriculture, and Ottoman economic and social history, this talk argues for the importance of nonhuman histories in understanding global economic, energetic, and political transformations.

    More Information >>


    The Many Fourteenth Amendments is presented by the Department of History and co-sponsored by the Office of the President, Office of the Provost, College of Arts & Sciences, University of Miami School of Law, Center for the Humanities, University of Miami Libraries, Departments of English and Political Science

     Symposium

    Shalala Student Center, Third Floor, Activities Room
    Free & Open to the Public  |  Registration Required

    The U.S. Civil War from 1861-1865 resulted in a forging of a second constitution that in time transformed the structures of American governance. The Fourteenth Amendment has no single legacy. An amendment born in strife birthed an enduring conflict over the meanings and limits of equality, citizenship, and due process. To mark the 150th Anniversary of the ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment, this research symposium will explore the origins, consequences, and legacies of the many Fourteenth Amendments. 

    The keynote address to this conference will be the Henry King Stanford Distinguished Professor Lecture by Dylan C. Penningroth on March 1st.
    Two separate registrations are required for the keynote address and The Many Fourteenth Amendments conference.

    REGISTER

    Click here for more information


     

     Lunch Seminar on Expanding Career Opportunities for PhDs:

    "The Humanist Entrepreneur: Deploying Your Graduate Training Beyond the Academy"

    Amyrose McCue Gill

    Founder of TextFormations


    Monday
    3-26-1

    School of Nursing

    This event is aimed at graduate students thinking about more and less outside-the-box answers to the question "Why am I doing a PhD?". Amyrose McCue Gill (PhD Berkeley, Italian Studies) is the co-founder and an editor and translator with TextFormations, a manuscript preparation services partnership launched in 2015. She will share her postdoctoral experiences and describe how her doctoral work in the humanities came to inform her current career path in unexpected ways. Amyrose is happy to answer questions from questing graduate students and postdocs about everything from the academic job market to balancing family and career; from business concerns (like finances and marketing) to publishing processes (like editing and translation).

    Amyrose McCue Gill holds a PhD in Italian Studies from the University of California at Berkeley with specializations in Renaissance literature, early modern history, and women and gender studies. She has been a translator, editor, and project manager for over a decade, and handle projects in English, Italian, French, and Spanish. Her work in North America and Europe. With her colleague Lisa Regan, who earned her PhD in the History of Art, also from Berkeley, she established TextFormations, which provides customized support for writers and researchers in higher education, who are undertaking translation, writing, research, and publishing projects in North America, Europe, Asia, the UK, and the Commonwealth. They have assisted in bringing books to publication from university presses such as Cambridge, Yale, Oxford, Stanford, Toronto, as well as Palgrave, Brepols, Brill, Routledge, and many others; as well as articles published in peer-reviewed journals such as Representations, The Art Bulletin, and Renaissance Quarterly.

    CLICK HERE TO REGISTER


     

    "Writing and Revising Articles, and Getting Them Published"

    Amyrose McCue Gill & Mihoko Suzuki


    Monday
    3-26-1

    Richter Library, Third Floor Conference Room

    Mihoko Suzuki (journal editor) and Amyrose McCue Gill (article editor) are available to answer all of your questions about publishing articles in academic journals. What makes for a successful article? How do you choose an appropriate journal? What is the submission and peer review process like? When should I publish an article and how many should I publish? How long does it all take? This event will have a seminar format and will be driven by participant questions; come with all your worries and excitement about article publishing!


     

    Book Development Workshop:

    "From Pitching Proposals to Peer Review and Production"

    Amyrose McCue Gill & Ben Doyle

    Text Formations; Publisher and Head of Literary Studies for the Scholarly Division at Palgrave Macmillan


    Tuesday
    3-27-1

    Richter Library, Third Floor Conference Room

    This workshop, led by Ben Doyle (publisher for literature with Palgrave) and Amyrose McCue Gill (editor and translator with TextFormations), is aimed at scholars with monograph projects (in mind or in hand) who want to know more about 1. How to pitch a book to a publisher; 2. How to revise a dissertation or manuscript for publication; 3. How to handle the peer review process; and 4. How to prepare for production and publication. We will also touch on edited volumes and on developmental editing but there will be time for lots of Q & A. Come with questions about any and all aspects of publishing books. 

    Amyrose McCue Gill holds a PhD in Italian Studies from the University of California at Berkeley with specializations in Renaissance literature, early modern history, and women and gender studies. She has been a translator, editor, and project manager for over a decade, and handle projects in English, Italian, French, and Spanish. Her work in North America and Europe. With her colleague Lisa Regan, who earned her PhD in the History of Art, also from Berkeley, she established TextFormations, which provides customized support for writers and researchers in higher education, who are undertaking translation, writing, research, and publishing projects in North America, Europe, Asia, the UK, and the Commonwealth. They have assisted in bringing books to publication from university presses such as Cambridge, Yale, Oxford, Stanford, Toronto, as well as Palgrave, Brepols, Brill, Routledge, and many others; as well as articles published in peer-reviewed journals such as Representations, The Art Bulletin, and Renaissance Quarterly.

    Ben Doyle is Publisher and Head of Literary Studies for the Scholarly Division at Palgrave Macmillan. He has worked on the list for nine years, originally starting in 2009 as an Editorial Assistant. Ben overseas an editorial team of five people, based in London and New York

     CLICK HERE TO REGISTER


    ‌‌ Karen Mathews (Art & Art History), 2016-2017 Humanities Faculty Fellow

    Karen Rose Mathews

    Assistant Professor of Art History
    University of Miami

    Conflict, Commerce, and an Aesthetic of Appropriation in the Italian Maritime Cities, 1000-1150

    Wednesday
    3-28-18

    8:00 PM
    Books & Books
    Public Invited
    Directions...
     

    Karen Rose Mathews is Assistant Professor of Art History at the University of Miami. She has published numerous articles on the visual culture of the medieval Mediterranean. She is currently editing an interdisciplinary volume on medieval Pisa and working on a book manuscript, “Mapping, Materiality, and Merchant Culture in the Italian Maritime Republics, 1100-1400.”


    Ginema del Rio Riande

    Professor of Medieval Studies, University of Buenos Aires 

    Refounding the Digital Humanities from the South


    Wednesday
    3-28-18
    4:00 PM

    Lecture
    School of Nursing, Executive Board Room

    This talk will focus on a “think global, act local” approach to digital humanities, through the perspectives of North-South, Western-Eastern, Canon-Corpus, and Center-Periphery, with the aim of reflecting upon the trajectory of the discipline. Case studies on epistemological diversity from the global South will enable an understanding of the global effects of its institutionalization. An emphasis on some Humanidades Digitales projects and initiatives from Latin America and the Caribbean will demonstrate how concepts such as the commons have been reshaped, significantly advancing the rethinking of Open Access and Open Science.

    Gimena del Rio Riande is Professor of Medieval Studies at the University of Buenos Aires and Researcher at the Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas y Crítica Textual of the National Scientific and Technical Research Council, Buenos Aires. Her scholarship focuses on the use and methodologies of scholarly digital tools as “situated practices.” She is the cofounder of the Laboratorio de Innovación en Humanidades Digitales, Madrid, and of Revista de Humanidades Digitales, the first Spanish digital humanities journal; she is also vice president of the Asociación Argentina de Humanidades Digitales.

     

    More information >>

  • APRIL 2019

    Ingrid D. Rowland

    Professor of History, University of Notre Dame
    Professor, University of Notre Dame School of Architecture, Rome

    Two Renaissance Magnates: Agostino Chigi and Jakob Fugger (Public Lecture)


    Thursday
    4-5-18
    7:00 PM

    REGISTER

    Public Lecture
    Kislak Center
    Public Invited

    “[Rowland] brings this lost world back to the three-dimensional life and vivid color [in The Culture of the High Renaissance]… a splendid writer whose words evoke unforgettable images of Renaissance society.” 
    — The New York Review of Books

    More information >>


    Joshua Knobe

    Professor of Cognitive Science and Philosophy, Yale University

    IRG Cognitive Studies Lecture: "Norms and Normality"


    Friday
    4-6-18
    3:30 - 5:30pm

    REGISTER

    Third Floor Conference Room, Richter Library

    People ordinarily distinguish between ways of behaving that are "normal" and those that are "abnormal." But how exactly is this distinction to be understood? This talk will discuss a series of experimental studies designed to explore people's ordinary notion of normality. The key result is that people's ordinary notion of normality is not a purely statistical one (e.g., the type of behavior that is most frequent) or a purely prescriptive one (e.g., the type of behavior that is ideal). Instead, our ordinary notion of normality appears to mix together statistical and prescriptive considerations. I discuss implications of these findings for a variety of questions in cognitive science.

    More Information >>


    "Transgressive Typologies: Constructions of Gender & Power in Early Tang China" by Rebecca Doran
    Rebecca Doran

    Rebecca Doran

    Assistant Professor of Chinese
    University of Miami

    Transgressive Typologies:
    Constructions of Gender & Power in Early Tang China

    Wednesday
    4-11-18

    8:00 PM
    Books & Books
    Public Invited
    Directions...
    The exceptionally powerful Chinese women leaders of the late seventh and early eighth centuries—including Wu Zhao, the Taiping and Anle princesses, Empress Wei, and Shangguan Wan’er—though quite prominent in the Chinese cultural tradition, remain elusive and often misunderstood or essentialized throughout history. Transgressive Typologies utilizes a new, multidisciplinary approach to understand how these figures’ historical identities are constructed in the mainstream secular literary-historical tradition and to analyze the points of view that inform these constructions. Using close readings and rereadings of primary texts written in medieval China through later imperial times, this study elucidates narrative typologies and motifs associated with these women to explore how their power is rhetorically framed, gendered, and ultimately deemed transgressive. Rebecca Doran offers a new understanding of major female figures of the Tang era within their literary-historical contexts, and delves into critical questions about the relationship between Chinese historiography, reception history, and the process of image-making and cultural construction.

    Rebecca Doran is Assistant Professor of Chinese and Director of Chinese Studies in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures at the University of Miami. Her research and teaching interests include Chinese literature, historiography, and Chinese language. More specifically, her work examines Tang and Song literature and cultural history, with particular interests in women’s literature, gender studies, and material culture.


    William Germano

    Professor of English, The Cooper Union


    Monday
    4-30-18
    4:30pm - 5:30pm

    "Archive of Information, Archive of Ideas"

    Exective Board Room, Nursing School
    For UM Faculty & Graduate Students
    More Information >>

    Registration >>

    Tuesday
    5-1-18
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    The Professional Scholarly Writer:
    A writing and publishing seminar for academic authors

    Ashe 427
    For UM Faculty & Graduate Students
    More Information >>

    William Germano is author of Getting It Published: a Guide for Scholars and Anyone Else Serious about Serious Books (University of Chicago Press, 3/e 2016) and From Dissertation to Book (University of Chicago Press, 2/e 2013). He writes a biweekly blog for the Chronicle of Higher Education’s Lingua Franca blog; he has also published essays on writing and publishing in the Chronicle and elsewhere. Other books: The Tales of Hoffmann (BFI Film Classics, 2013), on Powell and Pressburger’s 1951 opera-film, and Eye Chart (Bloomsbury, 2017), a short cultural history of visual measurement. During a first career as a scholarly publisher, he worked as editor-in-chief of Columbia University Press and as vice-president and publishing director at Routledge, a position he held for nineteen years.